Lt. Colonel Lorwyn E. Peterson – Park #73

I have said it before and I’ve got to say it again.. I meet the kindest people when writing and researching these stories.  When details are scant; I go looking for folks.  

This time I found the Atwell family who are direct relations of Lorwyn Peterson. It was a great pleasure to meet you personally!! 

Thanks again for the tidbits of information and the use of the photos.  

Truly – ag

PS. We will get to Fred Nagle next..

PETE IN CHARGE

Location: Pickford, Curtis and Greenfield

Lorwyn Elwyn Peterson (1908-1945) graduated from Michigan State College in 1930 with a degree in Business Administration. The son of Elwyn and Marie, he was raised in Brooklyn, a small town located in the Irish Hills area of Michigan.

 Photo of Lorwyn Peterson
The courageous and faithful Lt. Colonel Lorwyn Elwyn “Pete” Peterson circa 1943. Photo with kind permission from the Atwell Family.

Peterson enlisted for duty in World War II and rose rank to Lieutenant Colonel and Commander of the 716th Tank Battalion, 43rd Infantry Armored Division. Peterson’s relatives tell us he was to be made a full Colonel, however preferred to stay on with the men he trained for duty.    Continue reading “Lt. Colonel Lorwyn E. Peterson – Park #73”

President ‘Pres’ Collins Playlot – Park 34

BORN WITH THE RIGHT NAME 

President “Pres”  Collins was born on September 7, 1892 in Hurtsboro, Alabama.  His family made the move to Detroit around 1918 where he furthered his education and became an outspoken voice for his eastside neighborhood.

Talbot Street was the longtime home of Pres and Alice Collins and their 9 children.  He served as a precinct delegate to state political conventions and was active in his church. When old timers from the neighborhood passed away, he would solicit donations from folks in the area on behalf of the grieving family. 

TAKING ON CITY HALL

Collins organized the Buffalo-Mound-Talbot-Caniff Block Club and served as its president.  When Tri-City Sanitation, Inc. attempted to convince the city of Detroit to re-zone property in his neighborhood, Pres took action.  With the support of City Councilwoman MaryAnn Mahaffey, Collins and his group were successful defeating the proposed industrialization.   Eventually, the site was turned into the Mound – Alpena playlot to benefit neighborhood kids.   

Collins retired from the Skilled Trades division of Ford Motor in 1959.  He died on February 25, 1980.  The Mound – Alpena playlot was renamed Pres Collins Playground on January 27, 1982. Today, it is a large grassy area with older basketball courts.  This playground lacks fencing and signage but when it gets mowed, it’s a lovely greenspace.  The surrounding neighborhood has undergone positive redevelopment with newer built townhouses across from the park.  

Pres Collins Playlot .. looking good in the fall. Newer townhouses front Talbot Street.
Pres Collins Playlot .. looking good in the fall. Newer townhouses front Talbot Street.

 

 

collins_park_
Located where Mound runs into Mount Elliot.
copyright 2014 Andrea Gallucci 

Mortimer Nathan Lifsitz – Park 8

2015 Update:

Lifsitz playground has seen some action since I first wrote about it in June 2013.  The Canul family in Los Angeles contacted me to say ‘thanks’ for remembering Mortimer.  That’s my favorite part .. connecting with the relatives. The old playground equipment was painted last year by a volunteer group; basketball players continue their workout on an antiquated court; it was getting mowed pretty regularly and even had a short commercial filmed there.   In 2015, it’s been listed on the ‘for sale / reuse list’ by the city.  When the perfect buyer appears, this memorial park will disappear.  Mortimer’s memory will live on as an archival file and in the Jewish War Veteran’s Golden Book which features the Jewish Detroiters who were lost in WWII.  

Dear Mrs. Lifsitz :
Your son, Private Mortimer N. Lifsitz a member of Company “B”, 116th Infantry Regiment, has been awarded the Silver Star posthumously for his outstanding actions against the enemy.

Mortimer Nathan Lifsitz
A young man off to war.

The citation for his heroic deed follows:

Private Mortimer N. Lifsitz, 116th Inf, U S Army for gallantry in action against the enemy in Germany. On 17 November 1944, the advance of Company ‘B’, 116th Infantry was suddenly halted by decimating enemy fire. Seeing that the majority of its leaders had become casualties, Private Lifsitz attempting to lead assault, jumped to his feet and calling on the men to follow, started forward on the run. While charging toward the enemy positions, Private Lifsitz fell mortally wounded by enemy fire. Private Lifsitz lost his life in this encounter but in doing so displayed such personal courage and tenacity in the face of great danger that he materially influenced the results of the encounter. His actions reflect great credit upon himself and the Military Service.

The officers and men of the 116th Infantry Regiment have lost not only an excellent soldier but a friend as well. It is for the comrades and officers of Private Lifsitz to carry on the fight which certainly must bring ultimate victory over an enemy which has for so long brought misery and destruction upon the world.
Private Lifsitz will not be forgotten, nor will the supreme sacrifice made by him. In all sincerity, the officers and men of the 116th Infantry Regiment extend their most heartfelt sympathy.

Very Sincerely,
Sidney V. Bingham Jr.
Lt. Colonel Infantry Commanding

Mortimer Lifsitz was born on a Wednesday and died on a Friday. He was a Central High School graduate and worked in his father’s furniture business before enlisting.  The only child of Max and Sophia. Military records show he was previously wounded twice before he met death in battle. His military decorations include: The Silver Star, Purple Heart and an Oak Leaf Cluster.

map
Thanks google maps.

I have to check my notes but I do believe that at one point apartments were on the south side of the street and the park was just on the north side side of Gladstone.

 

SIGNS OF LIFE
The memorial playfield that commemorates Lifsitz’s leadership reaches down both sides of Gladstone Avenue west off Linwood in the heart of Detroit.  No signage, fences, or markings remain at this site. The play area is marked by a few pieces of old equipment; a bit of the basketball court, and a makeshift brick bench. While visiting there in late winter/early spring, we ran into a few ring necked pheasants returning to their nest. A good sign. A few years back, neighborhood residents turned this block long park into a giant community garden; a bright spot in a somewhat hard place, just like Morty.

I appreciate your readership. thanks ag

 

Photo courtesy of Temple Beth El / Franklin Archives.
Copyright 2013 – Andrea Gallucci.  All Rights Reserved.