Private John T. Yaksich – Park 32

So from what I hear and overhear.. I think this park got an upgrade or new signage over the summer.  There is always a lot of confusion about how to spell the Yaksich name.  Someone actually thanked me for spelling it correctly.  Ahhh.. it’s just the small things that make me happy.    I haven’t trolled through this neighborhood lately so I will have to make it a destination to take another photo.  ag

ONE MAN BLITZ

This neighborhood park is sandwiched between Anglin and Brinker Streets north of Nevada on Detroit’s east side.  Unfortunately, it is devoid of all signage to point to the heroics of John T. Yaksich, a courageous WWII hero. Conant Gardens, a historic and permanent African American Detroit neighborhood is nearby.  See photos below.

 

John Yaksich, 1943
John Yaksich, 1943 Photo: DPL RRF unknown primary source 

By February 9th 1943, newspaper headlines were screaming:

JAPS ADMIT DEFEEAT IN THE SOLOMON ISLANDS; the nation could partly thank Private Yaksich.

As a Marine in the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division at the Guadalcanal, he became known as “The One Man Blitz” for singlehandedly capturing Japanese weaponry and his courageous fighting which earned him the Navy Cross.  

At his own will and under heavy fire, Yaksich overtook a Japanese machine gun operator and subsequently captured his weapon.  Before killing the gunner, he saw hand-to-hand combat with two other Japanese soldiers and bayoneted them both.

Figuring he may become overpowered by additional enemy soldiers, he returned to his own front line and refreshed his cache of weapons/ ammunition.  Secretly, he worried about being reprimanded by his platoon leader for leaving camp without permission. 

“I knew that if I had asked to go they wouldn’t let me,” commented Yaksich. “So I told my buddy to give the word when I was .. to far to be called back to camp.”  Upon his return, Yaksich requested volunteers to help him carry the enemy machine gun back to the front lines.  A friend named Billy ‘Red Dog’ Van Orden stepped up to assist.  The Marines returned to the field and captured a second machine gun Van Orden had spotted.  Recalled Yaksich, “Van Orden shot the gunner.  We picked up the machine gun and ran.  Snipers tried to get us, but we were lucky.  Van Orden was magnificent.”

John T. Yaksich was born on April 7, 1922 and was released from service in November 1943.  It was  a hard road returning to civilian life but he made it through WWII and felt lucky in doing so.  He died on January 23, 1991.  He is one of the few Detroiters to be honored with a memorial park during his living years.

yackish
Yaksich Memorial Playfield lacks play equipment yet is well kept.
yak_conant_map
The red dotted area is the Conant Gardens neighborhood – important part of Detroit’s African American history.

 

conant garden2
Historical marker [located at the corner of Nevada and Conant]about how this important neighborhood came to exist.
All rights reserved. ©Andrea Gallucci, 2015.