Sam Greene – Park #68

I’ve been sitting on this story for a long time.. On this gorgeously sunny Detroit day I stopped by Greene Playground to take a snap of the park.  I met Curtis Green [same name as the park] and his friend Baxter.  We chatted a while and they pointed me in another [the right] direction to my next destination. A lucky day; Baxter has an El Camino [luv the El Camino] and you don’t see many of those outside the southwest.  Yes, it was a lucky day indeed; time well spent.  It’s the small things..  PS This one is for you too Tim Bailey of the Detroit Mower Gang because I know this is your favorite pocket park to mow.  It is a sweet park. ag

Sam Greene - Ellis and Robson - sweet and updated pocket park
Sam Greene – Ellis and Robson – sweet and updated pocket park

 

NATIONALLY KNOWN AND LIKED

How many people can be described like this?  A southern gentleman with a battered fedora, a grin, a dry laugh and a cigar that he smoked down until the ash smudged his lips.  This was Sam Greene.

greene photo 1935
Sam Greene, Detroit News, 1935. “He writes so vividly about the games that you feel yourself a spectator.” 

Continue reading “Sam Greene – Park #68”

Bruce Wark, Sr. – Park 54

STRIKING IT RICH

Bruce Wark as featured in the City of Detroit Vol 5 1701-1922.
Bruce Wark as featured in the City of Detroit Vol 5 1701-1922.

Sometimes when you search far and wide, you end up finding your future right in the place where you began.  Ontario born Bruce Wark (b.1874-1944) came to Detroit in 1894 and began selling typewriters.  Without result, he chucked that career and spent the last two years of the nineteenth century as a prospector in the Klondike seeking a gold rush fortune.  Pardon the pun, it didn’t pan out.  When he returned to Detroit in 1900, he would find his fortune was waiting for him. Continue reading “Bruce Wark, Sr. – Park 54”

Abner A. Wolf – Park #48

 THE COURAGE TO START SOMETHING BIG

Abner A. Wolf (b.1892) came from humble beginnings.  At the age of 12, he began sweeping the floor in his father Joseph’s store, squeezing his homework into his free moments at work.  In 1912, he paid $50 for a cart and a horse.  He took his remaining $350 savings and purchased merchandise to start his own small grocery on Joseph Campau in Hamtramck.  He was twenty.  Within three years, he had enough money and customers to move to a bigger space across the street.  And so it began… Continue reading “Abner A. Wolf – Park #48”